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Comparison between the exam Cambridge English: First and the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Cambridge English: First is one of the most...

Comparison between the exam Cambridge English: First and the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Cambridge English: First is one of the most widely taken of all the exams provided by Cambridge English Language Assessment and is accepted in commerce, industry, universities and higher education institutions as proof of everyday written and spoken English for work and first certificate in english book pdf purposes. Schools’ version have been targeted at the interests and experiences of school-age learners. The arrival of thousands of refugees from the Spanish Civil War and occupied Europe into the UK had created a growing need for language assessment.

One hundred and forty-four students sat the first LCE exam on 21 June 1939. By 1944, 18 languages were catered for in the translation paper, including Polish, Arabic, Hebrew, Czech, Persian and Swedish. Netherlands Fleet Air Arm, and the Czechoslovakian RAF Squadron. On one day in 1948 over 2,500 men and women of the Polish Resettlement Corps took LCE. A special version of LCE was also made available to prisoners of war detained in Britain and in occupied Europe. The test was made available to 1,500 prisoners of war in Britain, 900 of them Italians.

In Germany, the test was offered at seven prisoner of war camps, with Indian prisoners of war encouraged to take LCE or School Certificate exams. The qualification was further updated in 1984 and 1996. Following the 1996 revision, FCE covered a greater range of writing, listening and speaking micro-skills. In January 2015, another set of revisions were introduced. Reading and Use of English papers have been combined into a single paper.

The Cambridge English Scale was developed to provide exam users with more detailed information about their exam performance than was previously available. Cambridge English: First for adults and the level of the question papers is identical. Both versions of the exam lead to the same certificate. Schools’ version have been particularly targeted at the interests and experiences of school-age pupils.

Both versions of the exam are made up of four exam papers, designed to test the key language skills. Both Cambridge English: First and Cambridge English: First for Schools offers candidates the choice of taking their exam on either a computer or on paper. The Speaking test is taken face-to-face with two examiners and two candidates, providing a realistic and reliable measure of ability. The Reading and Use of English paper has seven parts and 52 questions. The paper contains texts totalling approximately 3,000 to 3,500 words and candidates are expected to understand different types of text, such as fiction, newspapers and magazines, promotional and informational materials. In Cambridge English: First for Schools the text topics are targeted at the interests of school-age pupils. 4, candidates read a range of texts and complete tasks that test their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary.

Part 1 has eight multiple-choice questions related to vocabulary in a text. 7, candidates read a range of texts and complete tasks that test their reading ability. Part 5 involves answering multiple-choice questions about a text, with candidates expected to be able to read a text for detail, opinion, tone, purpose, main idea, implication and attitude. Part 6 involves choosing paragraphs to fill the gaps in a text, with candidates expected to demonstrate understanding of the structure and development of a text. Part 7 involves matching statements to the correct part of a text or several short texts, with candidates expected to demonstrate reading for specific information, detail, opinion and attitude. The Writing paper has two parts.

Part 1 has one compulsory question and involves writing an essay. The Listening paper has four parts and includes a mixture of monologues and dialogues from a range of familiar sources, such as news programmes, radio broadcasts, speeches and public announcements. Candidates are expected to demonstrate a wide range of listening skills needed for real-life purposes, such as understanding the gist of an extract, listening for specific information, and understanding a speaker’s opinion, attitude or feeling. The Speaking test has four parts and is conducted face-to-face, with one or two other candidates and two examiners. Candidates are expected to be able to participate in discussions, express opinions, exchange ideas and reach decisions through negotiation. Part 1 is a short conversation with the examiner.

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