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We Westerners live in a world of continual and unrelenting distraction. Our days begin with the newspapers in the morning, sandra ingerman soul retrieval...

We Westerners live in a world of continual and unrelenting distraction. Our days begin with the newspapers in the morning, sandra ingerman soul retrieval pdf work world during the day, and television, other entertainments, or the internet in the evenings. Visionseeker I: The Spiritwalker Teachings – A shamanic workshop for modern visionseekers.

In addition, there are our self-promoting schemes and our ever-changing life-styles, replete with families and friends, restaurants and films and various cultural and endless sporting events, all of which are part of the multi-leveled template of distraction that we call life. Accordingly, throughout our days, and our nights, our minds are never, ever still. The internal chatter in our heads continues to surge this way and that, dealing with our problems and our fears and our widely-flung networks of relationships with everyone, everywhere. In response to all of this, we Westerners worry and we worry a lot. This brings me to consider a quite different state of being, one that the indigenous peoples of the world know well—a state that few in the Western world remember, although as I make this statement, I have to acknowledge that those worthies who have a meditation or yoga practice will know exactly what I’m talking about. Among some of the Australian Aboriginal peoples, this state of being is known as ‘dadirri,’ a term that literally translates into English as ‘deep listening. Several years ago, I received an email from some unknown soul—an unexpected missive that included the words of an Australian Aboriginal elder named Miriam Rose Ungunmerr-Baumann.

I had never heard of her before, but as I read through her brief statement, I realized that her narrative was filled with power in its simplicity and directness. Miriam Rose’s message is clearly for all of us, and so I share some of it with you here enhanced by some additional information about Aboriginal thought. For starters, Miriam Rose defines the ability called dadirri as a special quality that allows each of us to make contact with a deep spring that lies within us. To connect with that spring requires that we achieve a state of quiet, still awareness. It is similar to what we Westerners call ‘contemplation’ or ‘meditation. Shamanic practitioners know it well. For the traditional Aboriginals, Miriam Rose proclaims that this contemplative focus permeates their entire way of life, their whole being—that dadirri continually renews them on a day-to-day basis, bringing them peace, creating harmony where there is disharmony, producing balance where there is imbalance, restoring health where there is illness.

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